RSS Feed

Category Archives: Planning Basics

Wedding Planning: Welcome to The Knot

Posted on

Congratulations, you’re engaged! You and your fiance (isn’t it cool just to say it?) are probably
chomping at the bit to start planning your wedding, and it may be hard to figure out where to start! No
worries — The Knot team is here to help you plan our way, every step of the way. Sure, people will try
to convince you it’s all about guest lists and budgets — and that’s definitely a big part of it. But
not just yet…
Step 1: Check out wedding dresses
What better way to jump in than by browsing our gallery of over 20,000 pictures of gorgeous wedding
dresses!

Step 2: Get inspired.
Not yet ready for reality? Stick with the fun stuff — think about colors you like, the seasons that
make sense for your celebration, and any must-haves you’ll want to incorporate. Then decide on your
location, and book it! Have a season and a few potential dates in mind but be flexible, since the most
desirable locations book up early.
When deciding on a location, have a season and a few potential dates in mind but be flexible, since the
most desirable sites book up early.
Dont miss:
Wedding dress gallery
Wedding flower gallery
Real weddings
Step 3: Get started.
Next, get down to the nitty-gritty. (Don’t worry, go back to the gowns whenever you like…)
Wedding Checklist
Create a personalized month-by-month to-do list by entering your wedding date (enter an estimated date
if you don’t know exactly when). Meeting with your florist after work next month? Add it to your
checklist so you don’t forget. Appointments are going to start to pile up!
Wedding Budgeter
Come up with your number and plug it in. Based on industry-wide averages, we’ll give you a breakdown of
what percentage of your budget you can expect to spend where. Track your payments, add in your own
items, and see how much money you have left.
Step 4: Book it!
Congrats! Now you have a real, live wedding date! Go back and update your approximate wedding date in
your profile if you haven’t already. Here’s where the fun really begins: With your fabulously chic
vision in mind, bring your wedding to life. Follow the advice in these getting started links to choose
the right vendor and to get the right contract:
Wedding Florist
Wedding Cake Baker
Wedding Musicians
Step 5: Guests and Etiquette
Sure, this day is all about the two of you, but it’s also all about the people who’ll come to celebrate
with you.
Guest List Manager
Use our Guest List Manager to keep track of your list (import addresses right from your address book),
to record gifts you get, and note when you’ve sent thank-you notes.
Personal Wedding Web Page
Build a one-stop wedding web page to keep guests up-to-date on all the details of your wedding.
Ask Carley
Exactly how much time do you have to send out those thank-you notes? You’re going to have a million
questions along the way. Here’s where to get all the answers.

we have 8 years’ experience of oem/odm in formal dresses and bridal dresses industry.The main products
are bridal dresses, bridesmaid dress, evening dress, flora dress, wedding accessories, cocktail
dresses, ball dresses and so on.Floragown.com Buy Flora Gown ,Flora Wedding Dress – Flora Prom Dress
online shop.

Wedding Planning: The Worst Wedding Advice Ever

Posted on


From the moment you get engaged, it seems everyone has some wedding know-how to share. A lot of these
tips are helpful; some are borderline disastrous. We asked brides for the worst wedding advice they’ve
heard. Here’s what not to do when you plan a wedding.
Bad Advice: “The worst wedding advice anyone has told me was to sing our vows to each other.” Erin,
Richmond, VA
Our Advice: We totally encourage personalizing your wedding vows, but unless you moonlight as opera
singers, leave the American Idol aspirations for the wedding after-party.
Bad Advice: “My mom insisted that I wear my gold-colored junior prom dress as my wedding gown. She
thought it was silly to buy yet another dress that I’d only wear once.” Alyssa, Madison, WI
Our Advice: While hand-me-down gowns can add a sentimental touch and colored gowns are gaining
popularity, most prom dresses should stay securely in the back of the closet for the wedding day.
Bad Advice: “My future father-in-law thought that since we were getting married in an historic home and
I’m a costume designer, we should wear hoopskirts and crinolines!” Abbey, Austin, TX
Our Advice: We love historic homes, but unless you’re into the idea of a masquerade ball wedding, play
up the decor rather than your attire. Likewise, your wedding photos will be around for years to come,
so wear something that won’t leave your grandkids in hysterics.
Making out with the best man at the reception is a great idea — if your wedding happens to fall on
Opposite Day.
Bad Advice: “I was told that if the groom was unavailable during the toast, the bride has to kiss the
best man.” Anonymous
Our Advice: Making out with the best man at the reception is a great idea — if your wedding happens to
fall on Opposite Day.
Bad Advice: “My mother-in-law said that it was perfectly fine to spend $9 a plate on dinner for our
guests. She based this on my sister-in-law’s wedding, where they served cold meat sandwiches, au gratin
potatoes, and questionable-looking fruit salad.” Morgan, Madison WI
Our Advice: Food is one detail every guest remembers. Whatever your budget, you should allot about 40
percent of it for wedding catering. Work with your caterer to prepare a menu within your budget and try
to cut costs in other ways (like by trimming your wedding guest list) rather than skimp on the meal.
Bad Advice: “I was recently a bridesmaid in a friend’s wedding. I’m also engaged and was amazed when
she told me I couldn’t wear my engagement ring during her wedding because it was larger than hers…
ridiculous!” Scarlet, Longview, TX
Our Advice: Being upstaged by a bridesmaid can be a very real fear for some brides. Handle the
situation gently — explain that you’d rather not take off the ring for personal reasons. If she
persists, remove it to avoid more drama.
Bad Advice: “My mother wanted me to ask random pretty girls at church to be in my wedding party so that
my brother could meet and then date them.” Anonymous
Our Advice: It’s true that weddings are a great place to match-make. But your bridesmaids should be
your dearest friends and relatives, so pick attendants you know you (not your brother) will want
standing by your side at the altar.
Bad Advice: “My mother said that to cut costs, we could send invitations without an RSVP card. Guests
could go online instead and RSVP on the web page my dad built for us. I thought it was a good idea, but
only two people RSVP’d! I ended up having to call my entire guest list to find out who was coming.”
Nicki, Oklahoma City, OK
Our Advice: In the age of online-mania, RSVP cards are definitely still relevant, especially for older
guests who might not be as accustomed to the Internet. If you do opt for digital responses, enlist your
parents and attendants to spread the word and help guests who don’t have access to a computer. The
online option is an easy way to keep track of guest responses, but have a backup plan (a traditional
RSVP card) for those who aren’t as tech-savvy.
Bad Advice: “A lady I worked with overheard me telling another coworker how much my fiance and I were
planning on saving up for our wedding. She decided to pipe in and say, ‘Wow, you might as well just buy
a house, you’ll get divorced anyway.'” Caroline, Flagstaff, AZ
Our Advice: Avoid snide money-related comments by discussing your wedding budget only with those who
need to know, like your parents and fiance.
Bad Advice: “I was told that the bride and groom don’t receive the gifts. Instead, the bride’s parents
get them.” Suzie, Norfolk VA
Our Advice: Give each of your parents a small gift as a token of thanks for being so supportive
throughout the wedding planning process. The Cuisinart mixer and all the other goodies on your
registry? Those are definitely your gifts to keep.
Bad Advice: “My fiance suggested we randomize the seating for all our guests because it would be cool
for everyone to meet new people. I can just imagine my crazy friend from grad school and Aunt June at
the same table. Yikes!” Vicki, Durham, NC
Our Advice: This idea is only partly off-track. To mix tables with a few people who don’t know each
other is a good way to bring everyone together at the reception. But don’t put anyone at a table with
no one else they know, and spare Aunt June the stress by seating like-mannered guests together.
Bad Advice: “‘Beggars can’t be choosers.’ This advice was given to me when I decided to wait on making
a decision on a dress and venue. I have a low budget, but being rushed into any decision seems unwise.”
Erin, Rockford, IL
Our Advice: Sticking to your budget certainly doesn’t mean you have to settle. It’s always best to
check out a few options before you make a decision, and if a certain vendor is just out of your price
range, see if you can negotiate for a slightly scaled-down package.

 

Wedding Planning: The New Wedding Rules

Posted on


1. Old School Rule: The bride’s parents pay for the wedding.
New Rule Every couple funds the festivities in different ways. Maybe your mom and dad want to pay for
every single thing, but, unlike in the past where the bride’s family was expected to foot the whole
bill, they’re in no way obligated to now. Grooms’ parents and the couples themselves chip in nearly as
often as brides’ parents do. It just depends on your family’s situation. If you’d like your fiancé’s
parents’ help, your husband-to-be will need to ask for it—not you, and certainly not your parents.
Just remember: Whoever pays gets a say. If you know your mother-in-law will insist on an in-church
ceremony if she contributes and you’ve got your heart set on exchanging vows on a sandy beach, you may
be happier cutting your guest list than asking her to contribute anything.

2. Old School Rule: You must invite everyone with a guest.
New Rule If they’ll know others, skip the plus-one. It’s still polite (and very appreciated!) to invite
guests’ significant others, but if you’re inviting a group of coworkers, for instance, and two or more
of them are single, they should have no problem attending solo. Only when guests won’t know anyone
aside from the couple is it mandatory to let them bring a date. It’s kind to invite attendants with
guests too (they are shelling out big bucks for their attire!).

3. Old School Rule: Your registry should consist entirely of housewares for your new home.
New Rule You can register for anything from honeymoon hotel accommodations to skiing equipment. Guess
what, Grandma? Lots of couples live together before they get married and may have all of the towels and
blenders they’ll ever want. You can request upgraded versions of home items you already own, but
nothing should stop you from creating a honeymoon or otherwise “untraditional” registry. These are your
gifts, and you need to be happy with them! If you’re inviting a few Internet-less guests, including
items from a brick-and-mortar store they can actually get to will help prevent a buildup of unwanted
presents. But you should feel free to include a ping-pong table for your basement or the complete Sex
and the City DVD collection on your wish list if you can’t use yet another kitchen appliance. A word of
caution: Some of the older folks think that they know what brides and grooms really need, so they may
get you an iron even if you haven’t requested one.

4. Old School Rule: You must wear a white gown.
New Rule Wear whatever you want! Sure, most brides go the white or ivory route, but for your wedding
day attire, anything goes: from a cute cherry red flapper dress to a silver, slinky sheath to a (gasp!)
black pantsuit. As long as you feel fabulous in your outfit, it can be any color or style. You can even
skip the veil! Warning: Your fashion choices may wind up shocking your older guests, especially the
ones who equate wearing white with “purity.” If you’d prefer that your look pleases the crowd but
aren’t willing to go totally traditional, try working in a hint of color via a dress sash, your shoes,
jewelry or a hair accessory.

5. Old School Rule: Your mom can’t throw your shower.
New Rule Anyone can throw your shower! People used to think it was rude for the bride’s mother to host
a party where the sole purpose was for her daughter to get gifts. Other close family members, like
sisters, were similarly forbidden from hosting. We didn’t get this then, and we don’t get it now, and
luckily, today’s mothers of the bride are ignoring the passé etiquette. In some cultures and regions of
the US, like Italians in the Northeast, the mother always hosted her daughter’s shower. So encourage
your mom to throw yours if you think that she wants to! Your bridesmaids may be itching to throw a
shower for you too, so make sure that they coordinate with your mom before they make any definite
plans.

6. Old School Rule: You have to have a rehearsal dinner.
New Rule You can skip a rehearsal dinner. When couples lived separately before they got married and
engagements were a few weeks long, not a year or more, the rehearsal dinner was the first time both
sets of parents could meet. Since the mothers and fathers of the bride and groom would be responsible
for introductions at the wedding the next day, they needed to see each other first! Having a rehearsal
dinner is still smart when your and your fiancé’s parents aren’t acquainted, but if there’s no time or
room in the budget, then it’s okay to skip it, especially if your ceremony rehearsal has to take place
on a weekday or minutes before your actual wedding. It’s nice to treat out-of-towners to a welcome
meal, or you can just gather your closest local friends and family for a prewedding dinner, but neither
is required. Ask anyone who tells you otherwise if they’d like to plan and pay for it!

7. Old School Rule: The first time you see your groom on your wedding day should be at your ceremony.
New Rule You can spend every minute with your groom before the ceremony. We promise that it’s not bad
luck if your fiancé catches a glimpse of you in your gown on the wedding day (or even before it, but
why not surprise him if you both can hold out?). In fact, many couples who decided to wait until the
ceremony to see each other would’ve preferred to have the inevitably emotional experience in private
rather than in front of all of their guests. Photographers are happy to capture the moment you first
see each other before the ceremony, so take photos then. That way, you don’t have to miss your cocktail
hour.

8. Old School Rule: Ceremony seating is based on a bride’s side and groom’s side.
New Rule Guests can choose to sit wherever they want! It used to be that guests of the bride sat on the
left side at the ceremony and guests of the groom sat on the right. Even now, plenty of your guests
will go by this guideline to find their seats. But if your fiancé’s family is huge and yours is tiny,
your ceremony will look a little weird if most people are seated on the right side. And at Jewish
weddings, the sides are flipped anyway! (Gotta love when everyone winds up on one side at an interfaith
wedding!) If you’re having ushers, ask them to direct your VIPs, parents, grandparents and the like to
prime seats toward the front of either side and instruct your other guests to sit in any open seat. No
ushers? No problem. Place a sign in the area where people pick up their programs and have it read, “Sit
anywhere you like!” That’ll send the message loud and clear.

9. Old School Rule: You must walk down the aisle.
New Rule You don’t have to walk anywhere! Perhaps you’re a flats-wearing gal and your trip down the
aisle may turn into a real trip in your wedding day heels. Or maybe you’d prefer to skip all the hoopla
that’s associated with that long walk. Whatever your rationale, it’s your prerogative. Your groom is
already going to be up at the altar; why can’t you be too? Who says that you have to have a
processional at all? Yet, for Jewish weddings, it’s strongly suggested that brides (and grooms too!)
walk down the aisle. That’s because they each make their way to the huppah with both of their parents.
If you want to skip the walk but still want to honor your mom and dad, present them with flowers or
other gifts during your ceremony.

10. Old School Rule: You have to leave for your honeymoon right after your reception.
New Rule You can go on a honeymoon whenever you want. Heading straight to your honeymoon sounds
romantic, but it can be a logistical nightmare. Think it over: You’d have to lug your luggage from the
ceremony to the reception and keep your passport and plane tickets in a safe place the entire day. But
even if you’re the queen of organization, you’ll be so exhausted from your whirlwind day that you’ll
want nothing more than to just veg out for a while with your new husband after the wedding. And that’s
okay! When you take a honeymoon is entirely up to you two (and maybe your boss a little bit). No matter
if you leave the day after or the year after, it’ll still be the wonderful, well-deserved vacation you
always imagined it’d be.

Wedding Planning: The 4 Wedding Rules You Can Break

Posted on


Yes, it’s true there are a lot of traditions when it comes to weddings, but things have changed too.
Here it is in black and white — those formally set-in-stone rules that just don’t hold up anymore
(despite what the ‘rents say).
Old School Rule #1: The bride’s parents pay for the wedding.
New Rule: Every couple funds the festivities in different ways. Maybe your mom and dad want to pay for
every single thing, but, unlike in the past where the bride’s family was expected to foot the whole
bill, they’re in no way obligated to now. Grooms’ parents and the couples themselves chip in nearly as
often as brides’ parents do. It just depends on your family’s situation. If you’d like your fiancé’s
parents’ help, your husband-to-be will need to ask for it — not you, and certainly not your parents.
Just remember: Whoever pays gets a say. If you know your mother-in-law will insist on an in-church
ceremony if she contributes and you’ve got your heart set on exchanging vows on a sandy beach, you may
be happier cutting your guest list than asking her to contribute anything.

Old School Rule #2: You must invite everyone with a guest.
New Rule: If they’ll know others, skip the plus-one. It’s still polite (and very appreciated!) to
invite guests’ significant others, but if you’re inviting a group of coworkers, for instance, and two
or more of them are single, they should have no problem attending solo. Only when guests won’t know
anyone aside from the couple is it mandatory to let them bring a date. It’s kind to invite attendants
with guests too (they are shelling out big bucks for their attire!).

Old School Rule #3: Your registry should consist entirely of housewares for your new home.
New Rule: You can register for anything from honeymoon hotel accommodations to skiing equipment. Guess
what, Grandma? Lots of couples live together before they get married and may have all of the towels and
blenders they’ll ever want. You can request upgraded versions of home items you already own, but
nothing should stop you from creating a honeymoon or otherwise “untraditional” registry. These are your
gifts, and you need to be happy with them! If you’re inviting a few Internet-less guests, including
items from a brick-and-mortar store they can actually get to will help prevent a buildup of unwanted
presents. But you should feel free to include a ping-pong table for your basement or the complete Sex
and the City DVD collection on your wish list if you can’t use yet another kitchen appliance. A word of
caution: Some of the older folks think that they know what brides and grooms really need, so they may
get you an iron even if you haven’t requested one.
Old School Rule #4: You must wear a long, white gown.
New Rule: Wear whatever you want! Sure, most brides go the long white or ivory route, but for your
wedding day attire, anything goes: from a retro short dress to a silver, slinky sheath to a (gasp!)
black pantsuit. As long as you feel fabulous in your outfit, it can be any color or style. You can even
skip the veil! Warning: Your fashion choices may wind up shocking your older guests, especially the
ones who equate wearing white with “purity.” If you’d prefer that your look pleases the crowd but
aren’t willing to go totally traditional, try working in a hint of color via a dress sash, your shoes,
jewelry or a hair accessory or opting for a tea-length dress.

 

Wedding Planning: Q & A With Wedding Planner Steve Kemble

Posted on


Want your wedding to stand out? Steal one of these clever ideas from guest expert and wedding planner
Steve Kemble (stevekemble.com), star of the special, “Battle of the Wedding Planners,” which airs on
Friday, November 13, at 10/9c on TLC.
Q What’s the most creative thing you’ve done for a ceremony?
A Years ago — way before any YouTube sensations of bridal parties singing or dancing — I
choreographed a full production number with make-believe bridesmaids and groomsmen. This couple was
always known for pulling pranks on their friends and family, so we hired 16 models to play the parts.
Guests were stunned by the beauty of the wedding party as they walked down the aisle. The group then
broke into song as the real wedding party walked down the aisle, and the crowd realized it was all for
fun! It created such a wonderful energy for the wedding.
Q And what about for a reception?
A For one recent wedding, the couple were huge fans of gospel choirs, so I found one to surprise them
with a performance during the reception. It was a huge hit! Every guest was singing and clapping along
with the choir as it serenaded the couple.
Q What’s your favorite wedding theme?
A I like “romance” as a wedding treatment. You should tell your love story through different aspects
of the wedding so your guests will literally say, “Ah, they’re so in love!” Include how you fell in
love in a special keepsake program for your guests, and pick a ceremony site and reception venue that
are romantic in nature, like a beautiful park with a glorious fountain or a beach at sunset.
Q What seemingly small detail can make a big impact at your reception?
A Candles are the most cost-effective way to create an atmosphere of romance at your wedding. I love to
use candles in various sizes and shapes — tea lights, votives, pillars, and more — throughout the
reception venue. Just steer away from scented candles; you don’t want them competing with the fabulous
aromas of the food you serve.
Q How can you personalize your wedding in an easy way?
A Incorporate beautifully framed photos of family and friends on the tables and around the site, serve
your favorite foods at the reception (one couple even had the chef use their family recipes to prepare
the food!), and give guests discs of music that was played at your reception. They’ll remember your
wedding every time they pop in the CD!
Q What do wedding guests enjoy the most?
A When all the traditional dances (like the father/daughter and mother/son dances) are done to one song
instead of multiple ones, it’s quicker, and the energy and movement this provides has guests applauding
loudly! Guests also really love the “lounge look,” when the reception is set up with various
furniture groupings. Not only does this provide comfortable places for your guests to gather, it also
encourages conversation among people who don’t know each other that well.
Q How can you keep the reception exciting?
A Lighting is becoming one of the hottest wedding must-haves. Crowds love it when you change the mood
and atmosphere as the night goes on through color and lighting design. Guests also love the mix of a DJ
and a band. When the band takes a break, the DJ takes center stage!

we have 8 years’ experience of oem/odm in formal dresses and bridal dresses industry.The main products
are bridal dresses, bridesmaid dress, evening dress, flora dresses, wedding accessories, cocktail
dresses, ball dresses and so on.Floragown.com Buy Flora Gown ,Flora Wedding Dress – Flora Prom Dress
online shop.

Wedding Planning: Knotties Biggest Wedding Regrets

Posted on

From a drama-filled bachelorette party to a shiny-faced bride — check out the biggest wedding regrets from Knotties on our Snarky Brides board so you don’t make the same ones! In a nutshell: Leave it to the pros.
“I regret not hiring a professional videographer. There were so many funny, sentimental, thoughtful, surprising, best-day-of-our-life moments that I wish were captured on video.” — mobridetobe
“My biggest regret is not factoring in what a huge pain it would be taking everything down at the end of the reception. The cost savings of DIY tend to disappear when you remember that you have to provide table linens, silverware, coffee cups, etc., AND take it all down…in your wedding dress.” — ohwhynot
“My only real regret is not having my makeup professionally done so that I wasn’t a shiny face three hours in.” — AmoroAgain
“My biggest wedding regret was having eight bridesmaids and nine groomsmen. My bachelorette party was a drama-filled disaster. We were late to our own reception because two bridal party members wandered off between the wedding and the reception and were nowhere to be found.” — goheels05
“My biggest wedding regret was having a family friend take photos instead of hiring a photographer. She had a lot of heart, but the pictures were really disappointing.” — betrothed123
“My biggest regret was trying to entertain too many out-of-town guests. I was so grateful that our family and friends traveled to be at our wedding, but I got so little sleep the two nights before. I was exhausted on my wedding day.” — COkristi
“I wish I would have paid more attention to the photographer’s ‘must-have’ photo list. We didn’t get photos with all the family.” — LesPaul
“So far I regret not having my invitations done professionally. I did them myself on my computer and printer, and it was a major pain in the a*s!” — mssillysarah
“I regret worrying so much about my MIL’s behavior before the wedding. Yes, she did some things that were annoying, but I didn’t even notice that day. I was way too into my wedding day to bother getting worked up over her, and I wish I had known that to save me weeks of prewedding worry.” — MeaghanandMichael
“I regret letting the wedding become bigger than we originally wanted it. While I loved our entire wedding day, I always felt we didn’t give enough face time to all of our guests.” — Nebb
“My biggest wedding regret is being too cheap to get my dress bustled! I dragged it around all night and tripped over it way too many times.” — kikibaby
“I wish I would have done a photo booth at the reception.” — twilight.rose
“I regret choosing a dress too early. I didn’t have the money to buy a new one, but I didn’t like the style a year later.” — barbbhoww
“Having a family member make my cake is my wedding regret. While she was a trained pastry chef and the cake was delicious, it just didn’t have a great presence.” — drwedding2

 

Wedding Planning: How to Plan Your Wedding at Work (Without Getting Fired)

Posted on


Wedding planning might be a full-time job, but chances are you’ve also got that other full-time job — you know, the one you had long before he put that ring on your finger. Even if you’ve hired a hands-on wedding planner, you probably still need to decide on some things yourself. How to deal? Plan for some serious, um — let’s call it multitasking. Here’s how to find the time do it all without winding up in hot water with your boss.
When to Do What
Finding Vendors: Daytime
Researching vendors online — checking out sites, listings on the local pages of TheKnot.com, or reading other to-be-weds’ recommendations — is an obvious one for that spare five minutes before you have to run into a meeting. One caveat: Make sure the volume on your computer is turned off, or at least way down! If a digitized version of “Wedding March” starts blasting, you are so busted.
Finding Inspiration: Daytime
Here’s another instance where the Internet is your best friend — browse for gowns, bouquets, and more online (just check out the image search on TheKnot.com for thousands of wedding photos of, well, everything). You’re more likely to have an aha moment the more you see, so spending time online is a good way to get through the doldrums of your work day (like mid-afternoon, when lunch is ancient history and it feels like the end of the day is never going to come).
know your priorities
Sure, you might need to finalize the guest list today, but don’t do it at the expense of a huge work project. In the long run, you’re much worse off compromising a work deadline than a wedding one.
Visiting Vendors: Free time
Unless you’re just doing a drive-by to check out their digs, keep actual vendor visits to your days off or weekends.
You’re going to want to visit most vendors as a tag team, so you’ll need your fiance with you. More importantly, if you really like the vendor, you can talk much longer without worrying about going over your lunch hour. Better to play it safe and plan visits for when you know you don’t have work commitments.
DIY Stuff: Nighttime
Did you really think you’d be able to assemble programs at your desk? Or that your boss won’t notice you printing out 200 favor cards on the color printer? Wedding projects (like tying the bows on all those favor boxes) are definitely a nighttime activity — kick back with a glass of wine and a DVD of the last season of Grey’s Anatomy while you fold 300 sheets of vellum.
Making Lists: Anytime
Playlists, guest lists, and even to-do lists — whether you manage them online or on paper, keep these at your fingertips so whenever you think of something, you can update them.
3 Tricks for Not Getting Caught
Stay on Task You want to fly under the radar — if it’s blatantly obvious that your work time has become wedding time, you risk the wrath of your coworkers or even worse, your boss. You can’t let wedding planning take up your entire day, but you can definitely let it replace time you would have spent instant messaging. The key: Stay on top of your normal tasks and goals, and don’t let planning affect your performance.
Go Online Do not, we repeat, do not bring your wedding binder to work. A notebook full of decor ideas and fabric swatches is way too obvious (unless perhaps you’re an interior decorator). Leave the real deal at home and add ideas to a digital notebook (like the one on TheKnot.com) at work. You can save articles, photos, and gowns you like — and remember, if you really need something you can actually hang onto, you can always print out the pics.
Watch Your Back It should be obvious, but use your best judgment when it comes to planning your wedding while you’re supposed to be working on your work (you know, the stuff they’re actually paying you to do). Don’t leave a wedding-related web page or document on your screen if you have to step away from your desk — close or minimize it. And keep more than one window open so if someone comes by it’s easy to tab over from your reception site’s floor plan to something more legit.
4 Ways to Max Out Your Free Time
Your Commute In the subway? Read wedding magazines or go over your lists. On the train or a bus? Use a laptop or Blackberry to email or surf the web wirelessly or, if it’s not too loud, make a few quick check-in phone calls with vendors before their day gets too busy. Driving? Use the voice notes feature on your cell phone to record any sudden bursts of inspiration. No matter how you commute, use your iPod or CD player to preview potential ceremony or first dance tunes — you’d feel lazy sitting around your house doing it, but if you’re stuck in traffic, why not crank up Pachelbel’s Canon in D?
Your Lunch Hour Plan to devote at least a few days a week to vendor phone calls. The key is to plan out your conversation beforehand and make a list so it can be swift and tactful. That way, you’ll still have time to enjoy that grilled chicken salad.
Your Workout Don’t just watch CNN scroll by while you’re pedaling away on a stationary bike. Instead, use some of the time for wedding-related reading (for example, print out a bunch of ceremony or vow ideas to read over). If you go to the gym at the end of the day, that’s a good time to read back over your to-do lists, check off what you’ve completed, and jot down notes for what you need to do next.
Making Dinner Whether you’re waiting for the oven to preheat or unwinding while your fiance does the work, use the time in between prep work and mealtime to hop online. A watched pot never boils anyway, right? Hit the message boards, Real Weddings, or gown search on TheKnot.com and make that spare 5 or 10 minutes count.
3 Things to Watch Out For
Limit Your Sources If you’re asking your coworkers for a bit of wedding advice — even something simple like, “Do you like periwinkle better than peach?” — make sure they’re on your invite list. The more a work pal feels involved in your wedding, the more she’ll feel snubbed when that big square envelope doesn’t arrive. The exception: if you’ve already made it clear your guest list is going to be limited.
Get Your Apology Accepted You’re running late handing in an update on a project, your boss comes over to check on you, and — uh-oh — you’re on TheKnot.com message boards. How do you deal? First, fess up. In this case, honesty is the best policy. Tell her the project’s actual status, and say that you just needed a minute to clear your head before plunging back into your work. Then try not to let it happen again. If you arouse your superior’s suspicions, you’ll be monitored that much more closely.
Protect Yourself Look up your company’s policy for computer use. No employer wants you to use your computer for personal reasons, but what you need to check out is just how extensively your online activity is monitored. If it seems like Big Brother is watching, you may need to scale back your at-work wedding planning — but don’t worry, you’ll still find a way to get it all done.